Barrel Storage....

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Grove r
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Barrel Storage....

Post by Grove r » Mon Oct 15, 2007 11:58 pm

Using a newer, thinner forty five gallon oil barrel, metal, with the top cut out....I use an old ax head with a short handle and short handled eight pound hammer to remove the top.....for storage of chains, boomers and come-alongs....hook the hooks on the top rim and let the rest hang down inside. Sure keeps everything where it can be found without having hooks and stuff, with chain ends on the floor......something else that is developing here, is the spraying of hooks with paint....I use silver for visibility, and think it makes "loosing" them less of an issue....I think..... may even start to store the crowbars in there too.....soons I can find em.... :sad: :???:

have a good one,
Ron.E.

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Ron/PA
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Post by Ron/PA » Tue Oct 16, 2007 4:29 am

I like the barrel idea. That's gonna go on my list, chains inside, come alongs outside, and ought to be heavy enough that I won't knock it over.
Painting chain hooks is a passion of mine, mostly so I can see them when I'm using them. Nothing ticks me off worse that hooking up a chain, then dragging my butt up on the tractor, only to find the hook slipped off the chain link. With a shot of flourescent orange paint, you can see the hook quick and easy.
Crow bars, pry bars, punches and chisels that might get used out in the grass or fields all get several shots of orange to aid in finding them after I throw them in a fit.
Whenever I store a chain in a container, I try to spray a light mist of oil on them, it seems to work it's way through the chain. and keeps the rust down.
Now, having gotten some new ideas from you, please help with one more item..
WHAT'S A BOOMER????
Ron

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Fawteen
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Post by Fawteen » Tue Oct 16, 2007 5:06 am

Ron/PA wrote: Now, having gotten some new ideas from you, please help with one more item..
WHAT'S A BOOMER????
Ron
A chain binder. One of the over-center leverage sort, rather than the ratchet type. The one that goes "BOOM!" when ya unlatch it and it throws that piece of pipe you were using for a lever about 40 yards across the field...

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Grove r
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Post by Grove r » Tue Oct 16, 2007 10:52 am

Thanks for explaining that to Ron, PF, that is exactly what they are, and what they do.....Lebus seems to be the prime manufacturer of these "load binders", in this country....have been buying them at garage/yard sales whenever they are available, mostly three eights or smaller, [chain]..... when I was gowing up, my bros had a trucking company, and the only 'load binders' I knew of were the home made ones, forge......and everyone called them "bear paws"....wasn't 'till I got working out in the oil patch that I heard them called "boomers".......found out later that our term "bear paw", was a bit out of line too......a real "bear paw" was a bit different....consisted of a handle, pipe, welded to a short piece of flat stock, to which three short pieces of chain, 'bout a foot long, were attached, maybe two and half inches apart.....the middle one facing one way and the two end ones facing the other, with 'grab hooks attached to the ends. To use, hook the center chain/hook to the chain being used, as a pivot point, move the handle one way and hook that chain/hook into the chain, move the handle in the opposite direction and hook the other chain/hook into the chain being used.....keep doing this, and you can tighten things up to the breaking point, if you have a 'cheater'....have used these to "winch" the pickup or whatever out of a mudhole, or to winch stuff up onto the truck deck, too......and they will NOT let go under load!!!! Hooks of the old days were made from a piece of flat stock of proper size, with a hole in one end for a "cold shut", [repair link], to fasten to a chain, and the other end sloted, and bent back like your first two fingers, to form a hook to hook to another chain....like a "grab hook".....but, hey, everyone knows this anyway......so, have a good one, :lol:
Ron.E.

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Russ/ks
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Post by Russ/ks » Tue Nov 11, 2008 6:23 pm

That is a good one. Dad used to cut the tops out with his stick welder. He would turn it up and blast away. LOL. Mostly for burn barrels.
Support your local shadetree mechanic.
Crime and ranchin doesn't pay.
Lubrication is cheaper than machinery.
Will pitch bundles for food or beer/ horseshoeing for cash, only.
Hopeless optimist.

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Dieselrider
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Post by Dieselrider » Wed Nov 12, 2008 1:53 pm

Fawteen wrote: A chain binder. One of the over-center leverage sort, rather than the ratchet type. The one that goes "BOOM!" when ya unlatch it and it throws that piece of pipe you were using for a lever about 40 yards across the field...
I guess them pipes might best be painted too.Lol! :D :D
If it was easy, anyone could do it!

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Fawteen
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Post by Fawteen » Wed Nov 12, 2008 3:55 pm

Paint just might be redundant. They have a nasty habit of whackin' ya onna gourd on the way by, so they're already blood-red when they land.

G'head, ask me how I know... :sad: :shock:

TB
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Post by TB » Wed Nov 12, 2008 4:25 pm

always have used a hatchet and a two pound ballpin hammer to open up barrels works slick like a big can opener. storage barrels always preferred the little grease drums like big garages of factories use. The lid crimps on so it can be resealed for outside storage if necessary. there a nice small so there eraser handle full of stuff. Thay usually aren't totally clean so there is usually some salvageable grease to be had. Dad always used it for his plow shears and what not to preserve them.
A clean workbench is an invitation for disaster.

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